“I’m Kind Of a Big Deal: We’re Talking Cover-up”

Collage Book by Vennie Kocsis

Collage art is a medium which I feel most in harmony with. For me, it’s akin to throwing runes and letting the story emerge on its own.

I picked up some outdated pocket planners from Half Price Books to up-cycle into new books. Below is a time-lapse video of my first collage creation in 2020 which has emerged thus far, a summary of everything I understand about a family story not yet fully told.

The process of making this book was approximately ten hours of sporadic creating over time. There are always breaks needed to keep myself balanced. I follow my body’s signals. Letting memory emerge can be a slow process. I take the time to let my subconscious guide me.

I have a painting I’ve been trying to finish since 2012. It can be a year or so before I create new art. It sits in my eye’s view. It is a depiction of a lucid dissociative memory. It is at least 60% done. Every time I begin to go to it, I stop unconsciously. I just can’t muster up the interest to finish it. The emotion won’t come, not the same emotion which was there when I started it. So, I wait.

I say to myself, “Ok. It isn’t time yet.”

This is my process of creating.

Digging into memory is like mining in a deep and dangerous tunnel system. It has to be done safely and with self-care in the forefront of importance.

While you will watch a short five minutes below, for me, it is hours of music and madness, glue and floating words condensed into a representation of glued together pieces from a cult childhood that left images in my cellular memory which tend to have a mind of their own.

Remember to get through it. Don’t stay in it.

A History of Sam Fife’s Move of God Cult

Click here to explore The Cult. 

SAM FIFE’S MOVE OF GOD CULT:

Sam Fife was a former Baptist minister who started his ministry in Florida in the early 1960’s.  He considered himself an apostle by way of a five-fold ministry concept based on the scripture in Ephesians 4:11 which states: So Christ himself gave the apostles, the prophets, the evangelists, the pastors and teachers.  Sam used very erratic methods in his sermon deliveries, sometimes calm, sometimes angry, raising his voice and screaming, then lowering his voice in these charismatic tactics to keep people rapt into his message. His methods are birthed from known mind-control techniques.

To understand the pre-cult social era one can explore a de-classified government program, Project MK Ultra, sometimes referred to as the CIA’s mind control program, which was an abusive program involved in human behavioral experiments. Tracing it’s history and declassification dates, it is said to have phased itself out conveniently as the cult era began to swiftly rise.

To become knowledgeable about Project MK Ultra, download the following free, 178 page .pdf document of The Select Committee on Intelligence, Subcommittee on Health and Scientific Research of the Committee on Human Resources Project MKUltra, The CIA’s Program Of Research In Behavioral Modification Investigativion held Wednesday, August 3, 1977.

Present were Senators Inouye (presiding), Kennedy, Goldwater and many more influential elitists who also were embedding themselves deeper into evangelicalism with connections to people such as Douglas Coe, “One Of the Most Powerful Men In Politics You’ve Never Heard Of.”

The behavioral modification tactics of the MK Ultra Project are mirrored in the abuse tactics used on us children in Sam Fife’s cult. Sleep deprivation.  Extreme beatings.  Demon possession casting out rituals involving extreme verbal and physical torture. Ice baths that lasted hours. Being forced into cold showers and sometimes beaten naked in the showers. Sexual molestation. Extreme labor. Limited Education.

Left in some of our minds is the question of whether this cult, and the cult era in general, was a transition into religious mind control testing and ultimate enactment. It takes an incredible amount of mind control tactics to convince hundreds of parents to not only allow, but participate in the violent abuse of their own children, more that the average little old southern evangelist preachers should know. This is what the leaders of The Move were able to enact through doctrine and instruction.

Fife’s recruiters set up what they called, and still call, body houses, which were basically churches being held in people’s homes.  They used these body houses for the cult recruitment of people who would ultimately be sent off to evangelical, socialists compounds scattered across the globe.

The leaders used fear of demons, non-cult members and the apocalypse as a key component of their recruiting. Messages such as the Communists were coming to invade America, allowed them to use The Cold War as leverage. Sermons were coupled with inferences of God’s love and extreme ego stroking (love-bombing) such as teaching the ideal that the cult was chosen by God to live safely in wilderness communities.  Sam used Zionist based theology which hailed the Jews as God’s chosen people. To date the cult is a believer of the Abrahamic religions.

This was all going on when the United States was in a very tumultuous time, racial tensions were boiling and a lot of citizens were angry over the Vietnam War. By 1977, Fife’s group was reported in a California newspaper to have around 44,000 followers, after one of Fife’s ministers, Bill Grier, was arrested for performing exorcisms on high school children.  Sam preached that he would never die and if he did, his death was an indication that the end of the world had arrived.  It was reported to us cult members in 1979 that Sam Fife had been killed in a plane wreck in South America, and allegedly no one could ever find proof of this plane wreck.  

After Sam’s death, his teachings lived on through his understudy minister, Buddy Cobb, who revered Sam Fife and continued on with his teachings.  Sam’s teachings are still referenced today by this cult.  Buddy ran his ministry out of Florida and Bowens Mill, GA, which still exists as well.  He travelled around to various compounds preaching and spent a lot of time in Delta Junction, at the cult I was on.  Buddy is elderly and allegedly has Alzheimer’s but many, many abusers are still alive.  So Buddy Cobb’s eventual death does not put an end to the existence of this very intricate and multi-layered cult.

History Of the Land Purchase at Ware, MA

On January 3rd of 1972 three men named Donald McClain, Robert Crowell and Leanord Banassek purchased 128.5 acres of land from a man named Fred L. Zajac.  Zajac owned land in other states, like Nevada. Before Zajac’s purchase of the Ware, Massachusetts property, there’s not a trail of who owned it prior. After research through the Ware Historical Society as well as a personal military friend there was a plausible possibility that the deed to the land was held by the Army Corps of Engineers.  During the 60’s and 70’s, some military base land was being privately sold off, not up for public auction.

On May 3rd, 1972, McClain, Crowell and Banassek sold the 128 acres of land to Sam Fife’s Mt. Bether Bible Center for one dollar. Crowell is still connected with this cult, allegedly a leader of one of the compounds/churches in the Midwest.

History Of the Land Purchases and Development In Alaska

Donald McClain’s son, Doug McClain was one of Fife’s traveling minister. He was also a major player in orchestrating the buying and selling of much of the cult property in Alaska during 1980. McClain’s Alaska land brokering partner was a man named George Harris.  At the time, Alaska was gearing up to start giving out pipeline dividends to its residents. Through McClain and Harris, Sam Fife’s ministry amassed numerous deed. This land had previously been homesteaded by cult members who flew to Alaska in the very early 70’s.

After the land was acquired, cult members were migrated to Alaska and began building compounds there.  Harris and McClain quit claimed the deeds back and forth to each other for 10 dollars. There are more compounds in Alaska than any other state as the cult members collected and gave over their income to the cult leaders. This income included the yearly Alaska dividend.

Members were told that Alaska was a safe place to be if the Russia Communists should invade. Financial estimates show that at about 1000 a head, with over 100 people on the five plus compounds such as, Haines, Hoonah, Edgerton, Sapa North and Living Word Ministry in Delta Junction the cult leaders were, at a base, bringing in around $500, 000 a year in members’ Alaska pipeline dividends alone. The cult would go on to create profitable businesses currently in existence.

The land buying in Alaska was a strategic financial move on the part of the cult.  We were right in the hub of military training and testing installations and frequently taken to Ft. Greeley. For a deeper look into the connection between the military base and the cult compound, read “Cult Child.”

Whitestone Farms, Delta Junction, Alaska’s website summary of their history own history, they proudly proclaim how a man named Doug McClain, along with Toby Williams, who was an elder on the compound I was at in Alaska, bought the parcels that Whitestone stands on today. The following is a screen shot from Whitestone Farms’ website’s history page.

It is important to build the background of how Sam Fife’s cult compounds were created, how some of the land was acquired and how they have a very, very long history of questionable connections and criminal behavior that has been going on for over 50 years.

RELATED LINKS:

The Cult is a compiled collection of downloadable documentation of Sam Fife’s Move of God cult and its associates.

“Wilderness Blues” by T.B. Botts describes the actually living conditions on some the compounds.

“The Still Before Dawn” by Suzanne McConnell shares abuses on some of the compounds.

Move Forward is a non-profit dedicated to exposing this group and helping survivors.

Sam Fife Cult Survivor Jacqueline Jarvis’ hub page. 

2005 letter written to the Father Ministry addressing the methods and abuse, but it was never answered.  Read it in its entirety.

“The Jane Tapes” are a recording of an actual supposed exorcism of legions of demons.  Sam Fife performed this exorcism on a woman named Jane Miller.  These tapes really show the psychotic aspects of Sam Fife’s personality.  I find the most interesting part to be the very beginning of the alleged exorcism when he uses a bit of a different, more solemn voice to introduce himself and then goes into this very elaborate description, talking about himself in the third person.

Pictured below, the men in the black suits, from left to right: Joe Lane (or Joe Ingles), Phil Martin and Sam Fife with Sam’s private plane (photo from 1968)

Sam Fife and Plane

Inside of the history of cults must be the consideration of how evangelical abuse methodology and abhorrently mimics military style torture and MK Ultra based mind-control testing methods. Sam Fife’s Move of God cult is one of the most abusive and least discussed cult in America, enacting the great con of keeping Alaska pipeline money going in a circle from cult members to cult businesses and back to the cult.